A family member reached out to me this morning for some advice. She has a daughter very much like my own. She is about five-years-old (still in pre-school) with a mood/behavior disorder and high functioning autism. 

Last night, my family member took her daughter to her first soccer practice. Shortly after arriving, she had a melt-down. It was not as severe as some, but she was quite loud, and she did do some flapping. In the midst of this, my family member heard another parent remark, "Oh, we have one of those on our team." You read that right, one of those. My family member did not react to the hateful words, choosing to just get out of there as quickly as possible.

I was livid! And heartbroken for my family members.

I was at work, and so, I shared the story with some of my co-workers as we were leaving for lunch. I was certain they would all be as furious as I.

Some weren't. Some said they would have probably made the same remark. They said they wouldn't just say something like that if a child was having a meltdown though. They would also say it if a child was exhibiting poor skills on the field or didn't want to get dirty. Or any number of reasons. I questioned them, asking, "You would seriously put down a five-year-old in front of the child and/or his or her parent?" 

The answer was yes. 

I could feel my eyes fill with tears, and I had to stop talking. The subject was changed, and we carried on with our lunch plans.

But I was hurt. And very, very sad.

After lunch, one of my co-workers asked me if I had been upset by their comments, and I, generally very non-confrontational in nature, said, "Yes, very." We discussed the issues a bit more. 

I told her that the conversation at lunch had solidified my resolve to keep fighting for awareness and acceptance of children with special needs. She asked, with genuine curiosity, what awareness and acceptance could do for kids like mine. I told her that I am hopeful that these children will be treated with kindness, compassion, patience, and understanding. I told her that children emulate what their parents do and say, and if a parent feels that it is acceptable to say something negative to or about a child that is different than his or her own, his or her child will grow up doing the same thing. 

I don't think our conversation changed her mind on the topic. I do appreciate her willingness to listen to me though. I know that she did not want me to be upset; we just have a difference of opinion.

It's funny though...a couple of days ago, I was sent information about the Dallas Stars having a charity night with free tickets for families with special needs children. I told the girl who sent me the information that I was so grateful that awareness of families like mine has led to companies reaching out and offering special opportunities to experience events that they never would have before. And it is true. Movie theaters often hold special viewings for kids with autism or sensory processing disorders. Museums have special events for kids with autism. A local organization held special Santa visits away from the hustle and bustle of the mall this past Christmas. The list goes on and on. 

Awareness is spreading.  Acceptance though? I think we have a long way to go. And for that reason, for my children, for the millions of special children and families out there, I will not give up.

Today, I learned that I must keep fighting.
 
 
I was doing so well with regular updates here! And then....I stopped. I will get back into writing regularly again! If I publicly commit like that, I have to do it, right?

I thought I'd write about Laura again today. Some of you are aware that in an attempt to motivate her to make good choices at school, I set a very high bar for her...if she could have 20 days in a row of good behavior at school, she would get her ears pierced. We got very close our first go around. If I remember correctly, I think she had 14 good days in a row! And then, she stopped.

So we began again. And again. And again. And again.

She started to get bad reports every day. In addition to bad behavior, though, she also was not doing her schoolwork. Previously, her academics really had not been negatively impacted. Sure, she might have to do her work in another room with an aide, but the work was done. That was not happening anymore.

We went to Open House last week at school. When her teacher saw us, she said, "I'm sorry I didn't have the chance to call you today." I replied, "It was that bad today?" Apparently, yes, it was. Her teacher told us that she has been completely unable to focus, has been incredibly hyperactive, swings her arms wildly, can't stand in line, plays in the sink's water (even rubbing the water all over her face), she jumps and twirls, the list went on and on. Her teacher expressed great concern that she was now struggling academically. 

At home, we have also noticed some changes. Laura has always walked high on her tippy-toes, but it has changed. She now prefers to walk on the knuckles of her toes. It looks incredibly painful, but this is her preferred method of transportation. She shows zero signs of discomfort and struggles to stop herself from doing it when we tell her to stop. 
She also makes strange noises with her throat and sinuses.  She suffers from severe acid reflux and has her entire life. I know what that looks and sounds like. This is different. We've also had some issues with a throat clearing vocal tic from ADHD meds. Again, this is something different. 

She bites her fingernails to nubs, picks and peels her toenails off, and refuses to let scabs heal. Here is a recent example of a scab that she has had for probably five months now. Warning: It's not pretty!
Picture
The scab itself is small--most of what you see here is dried, smeared blood. This was right before her bath one evening.
Her teacher has spoken to us about her scab picking before. She says that she tries to limit her to one band-aid a day, but then she ends up covered in blood, like this. We have seemed to find a way to help though--finally! Tom has been putting liquid bandage on it. It stings, and she doesn't like it. It's still not healed, but it's finally looking better. 

The way she was walking was so worrisome to me. I assumed it was a sensory-seeking behavior. She has always been fearless, impulsive, and constantly craving stimulation of some kind. I feared that she would now cause serious damage. I spoke to an OT (Occupational Therapist) while at Koby's ARD meeting, and she told me that she definitely would cause serious damage. 

I called our therapy company and requested an OT evaluation. It was conducted last week, and she will begin services in about two weeks. She plans to work on her fine motor skills and self-regulation skills. She may teach her how to brush herself. I'm eager for therapy to begin and am very hopeful it will help. She believes the noises she is making are another sensory seeking behavior--she suggested it could be a physical or auditory experience that she is getting from it. 

In the meantime, Laura has a psychiatrist appointment in two days. The major shift in her behavior came and continued after her last medication change. We are constantly trying to find the just-right formula for her. We are definitely not there. We are always trying to avoid the vocal tic from returning, but at this point, I'm wondering if the vocal tic may be something we have to accept if the medication is helping her to have better control of herself. We will discuss possible medication changes at the appointment. 

In addition, we are in the process of moving her out of play therapy and into cognitive behavioral therapy every week. It's a gradual process, but we are now having her in a weekly, one-on-one session. Before, she and Troy had joint or shortened bi-weekly sessions. I'm hoping that this will also help her.

All this to say--my beautiful daughter has some very real challenges. And though I am trying desperately to help her overcome them, some days, some weeks, I wonder if we will. I do know this: I love her far too much to give up. And I know she WILL get those ears pierced one day! 
 
 
I have a six-year-old, beautiful daughter whom I love immensely. I am extremely proud of her high intelligence, creative spirit, and artistic talent. She has been blessed with many enviable gifts, but she is also mentally ill, and of my three special needs children, by far, the most challenging to raise. Truthfully, I often find myself terrified of what she could be capable of. 

My daughter was a drug-exposed baby who was brought to me when she was a day old, and I loved her immediately! She was never an easy baby though. She suffered from severe acid reflux, which caused her to projectile vomit constantly. She struggled with sleep, had some delayed development, and although she was one of the prettiest babies I had ever seen, as she grew, she also became the most difficult to manage.

Of course, I chalked it up to her age. She was just a bit more naughty than most toddlers. I believed/hoped she would grow out of it. Sure, I knew her birth history, but I also felt confident nurture would outweigh nature. I did not have a moment's hesitation in choosing to adopt her and her brother. If I had a crystal ball that could see into the future, I do believe I'd make the same choice. I love her very much. 

What I am finding, six years in, is that nature is not a force to be reckoned with. My daughter is mentally ill. Nothing I do will ever be able to change that. Nothing. And some days, on really tough days, that truth is hard to face. 

Over the years, she has made momentous progress. She was completely out of control for so long, and now, she is able to function relatively well.  I try to remember that when the really bad days come. My friends and family members remind me, too, and that helps.

Still, the fear is there.  

I struggle with anxiety. I fully understand that my brain leaps to wild conclusions at times. I use self-talk to calm myself when I believe I'm being ridiculous. I also talk to others about my fears to gauge how realistic my concerns are. When it comes to my daughter, it is not often that I am told I am being ridiculous.

My daughter has, among several other diagnoses, Oppositional Defiant Disorder; she is impulsive, defiant, hyperactive, dishonest, aggressive (both physically and verbally), and lacks empathy and the ability to feel remorse. The school's official label for her: ED (Emotionally Disturbed). I'm not bothered by any of these labels or adjectives because they are our truth.   

To illustrate what I'm saying, I'll give you one example from about two months ago. She and her brother were arguing. It appeared to be a very minor squabble. They were in the living room; Tom and I were in the kitchen, a mere eight or ten feet away. We didn't even pause our conversation because they weren't even raising their voices. Suddenly, we heard loud screaming and crying. She had bitten his lip! I'm talking almost all the way through. There was blood everywhere, and his lip was severely swollen. She was so calm and appeared to be genuinely shocked when I sent to her room while we examined him. After making sure he was okay and didn't need to go to the hospital, I went to speak to her. I tried explaining to her how severely she had hurt him, telling her that he would have trouble eating, smiling, brushing his teeth, etc. for quite some time. She had no reaction, no remorse, no concern for her brother at all. Trust me when I say she is very intelligent. It is, most definitely, not a question of IQ. 

For weeks after the biting incident, I was afraid to let the children out of my sight. I know parents often joke about there being trouble when the kids go quiet in the other room, but I don't think most feel the terror I did in the aftermath of that evening. Luckily, it was an isolated incident, and things continued to go relatively well for quite some time. 

This week, she had a rough day at school, a very rough day.  She had to write a letter to the cafeteria workers that the teacher and I both had to sign to apologize for her lunchtime behavior. I also had her write a letter to her teacher to apologize for her classroom behavior. Although we went through each and every bad choice she had made that day (it had gotten so bad that she had to be removed from class), she actually did not believe she had done anything wrong. I truly felt hopeless that night.

Once again, friends and family consoled me and told me to remember her progress. I was encouraged to not give up. And I'm not.

She is worth fighting for.

I got on the phone the next morning with the psychiatrist, and we are going to make some medication changes. She also told me that perhaps it is time to move past play therapy and on to cognitive behavioral therapy. I called the play therapist and asked her to help me with the transition. The problem? They currently have a very long waiting list. I'm waiting for a call back before I start searching elsewhere.  I am in constant contact with her teacher. I will call for another ARD (Admission Review Dismissal) meeting if necessary to discuss other classroom accommodations for her, like increased time an aide is in the room with her. We started a new evening routine at home to try to help. And, of course, we began a new sticker chart, too. 

I will NOT give up on her.

It's hard though. I have moments of hopelessness and despair. It's very exhausting. And sometimes, although I know people have good intentions, they actually hurt my feelings because it feels as though they don't believe or understand the difficulty of our reality. I have to remind myself that very few people I know have experienced anything like what we live all day, every day in this house. Of course, they are doing their best to try to help me through tough moments.  Sometimes, though, I think a sympathetic, willing ear is what would be best.

You see, the reality is that no matter the quality of the therapy she has, the number of medications she takes, the strictness of the routines we follow, the number of specialists she has, the support systems in place, the positive reinforcement methods we try, the books we read, the lectures we deliver, the discipline we give, the doctors we visit, the prayers we say, the love we show...she remains mentally ill. We have no idea what the future holds for her. That is a truth that is sometimes difficult to accept.

I'm not looking for advice, though if you want to offer some, of course, I appreciate it! This is just what's on my heart right now, and I felt the need to write about it. If you're in a similar situation, take solace in the fact that you are not alone. Too often mental illness is brushed under the carpet, which can make reaching out so much more difficult.  

I also ask that if you are not in a similar situation that you show compassion to parents like me. None of my children look like they are not typical children. If we go to a store, I know that I can look, in the eyes of so many, like a "bad," overly-permissive parent who has no control over her children. If one tantrums on the floor, runs away from me, yells, throws things, or removes a mannequin's arm (don't ask), don't immediately jump on to Facebook to report what a horrible mother I must be who needs to spank my child immediately. Instead, give me an encouraging smile, try to engage my child with a "hello," or say a silent prayer for us. The smallest act of kindness can make all the difference in a moment like that.